Sunday, 26 March 2017

A World of Dumplings

There are as many types of dumplings served around the world as there are grains of sand in the desert.  Well, not quite, but you get the idea there are LOT of varieties of dumplings.

What yum cha wouldn’t be complete without dumplings? Wonton wrappers in a variety of colours enveloping a wide variety of fillings. Meats, seafood, and vegetarian abound in all manner of crimped parcel shapes and crescents, either boiled or steamed. Dipped in soy based or spicy sauces, or served in a fragrant broth.  

Potstickers are a form of Asian dumpling, usually boiled in water in a shallow fry pan until the water evaporates, which allows them to then fry against the hot pan turning a golden brown and becoming crispy. Similar to the Japanese gyoza, but gyoza generally have thinner casings and are a little smaller in size.

Russia has the pelmeni. A thin dough, encasing a usually raw meat/onion based filling. Served with loads of sour cream and fresh dill. Pelmeni literally means ‘ear bread’ due the ear like shape of the folded dumpling and they are usually boiled in water or beef stock. These pelmeni pictured below were purchased from a Russian Easter Bazaar and I can only hazard a guess how many 1000’s they made for this weekend event!

The pierogi is from Poland, and is similar to the varenyky of Russia/Belarus/Ukraine. Fillings for these are either savoury or sweet, and are circles of dough folded into a semi-circle, or crescent shape. Boiled, then fried.

The Italians have the ravioli, tortellini, agnolotti, the cappelletti… to name just few. Various shapes of flour/egg pasta abound, and the fillings range from meats, to cheeses, or vegetable based. Served with a sauce, or in a broth.

How about gnocchi? Something as simple as potato, flour and egg come together to create clouds of grooved boiled deliciousness. The grooves help the sauce adhere, and sauces are usually tomato or cream based.

Indian cuisine is peppered with a large variety of dough filled foods. From crispy fried savoury samosas filled with meats and vegetables, to modak a sweet dumpling filled with coconut and sugar and encased in usually a rice flour based shell.

The Brits can relate to flour based dumplings, cooked on top of a casserole or stew. Flour, milk, butter and herbs are staple ingredients. 

South America is home to flaky pastry crescents called empanadas which are usually flour or corn based pastry stuffed with meats and vegetables. Baked or fried to a crispy golden colour they pair well with spicy sauces.


What is your favourite dumpling?